Review fairyhouse 9th Jan

Wed 9th Jan 2013, 15:50

photoMister Hotelier and Robbie Power

Fahamore (9-4) continued his rise through the ranks with a resolute defeat of Abbey Lane in the Buy Tickets On-Line At fairyhouse.ie Rated Hurdle.

The ex-Gordon Elliott inmate Abbey Lane was sent off the 7-4 favourite on his first start for Willie Mullins, despite an absence of almost two years, and Ruby Walsh moved him up to challenge at the last.

Butp>Fahamore was going just as well and although he only prevailed by a short head, the impression created was one of a progressive young hurdler with plenty up his sleeve.

Sarabad had to settle for the runner-up spot yet again in the Racegoer's Package 25 Euros Maiden Hurdle.

Mullins' French recruit has let down favourite-backers on each of his five Irish starts now, and those who took the 5-4 here knew their fate when he couldn't match the acceleration shown by length-and-three-quarter winner Mister Hotelier (5-1) between the final two flights.

Mullins suffered another costly reverse when Raise Hell could only manage third behind 9-2 shot Carsonstown Bridge, who just pipped Some Drama to the Fairyhouse Membership Maiden Hurdle spoils.

The application of a visor did the trick for Whatdreamsrmadeof as she justified 4-1 favouritism to break her duck in the Follow Fairyhouse On Twitter Handicap Hurdle.

Miss Xian (5-2 favourite) was another to taste success for the first time, but had to work much harder than Whatdreamsrmadeof, and she was all out to repel a handful of challengers in the Follow Fairyhouse On Facebook Maiden Hurdle.

Mister First (5-1) capitalised on a timber figure that is significantly lower than his chasing mark by stretching nine and a half lengths clear of his rivals in the Home Of The Ladbrokes Irish Grand National Novice Handicap Hurdle.

Carrigeen Lonicera benefited from Liz Lalor's enterprising tactics as she proved too strong in the Special Offers For Easter Mares Flat Race.

Might Bite To Prove His Worth Next Season

There is not much attention given to national hunt racing in the summer months, by punters or by the media. It is, of course, understandable given that our attention is focused on the flat season: the action at Royal Ascot, the Classics and the rest of the elements that define the summer racing season. Some punters might have a dabble at an ante post bet for Cheltenham next year, but by and large we forget about it until the autumn.

THE IRISH TIMES