Review dundalk 12th Dec

Wed 12th Dec 2012, 21:20

photoCopper Dock holds on in bunch finish
©Healy Racing Photos

Tom McCourt's Copper Dock recorded his sixth Dundalk win on his 80th career start in the Christmas Party Packages At Dundalk Stadium Handicap.

After breaking sharply, Ben Curtis restrained the 6-1 chance in third place through the early stages and he was in the perfect position as they fanned out on the turn for home.

Curtis waited until the furlong marker to ease to the head of affairs and although the rider struggled momentarily for his whip, Copper Dock held on by a diminishing head as Mea Parvitas flashed home late.

Davy Russell's first ride on the Dundalk all-weather ended in defeat in the Christmas Party Nights At Dundalk Handicap.

Riding Discoteca, the champion jumps jockey could only manage 11th behind 4-1 favourite Roe Deer.

Mick Halford's well-backed Rummaging (11-10 favourite) supplemented his recent maiden triumph with a narrow verdict over stablemate Lord Kenmare in the Dundalk Stadium - Light Up Your Night Apprentice Handicap.

The market leader came under the Conor Hoban drive over two furlongs from the finish but he gradually wore down front-runner Greek Canyon, and though Lord Kenmare finished well, the line came in time as Rummaging dug deep for a half-length triumph.

Halford was in the groove again as Won Diamond (2-1 favourite) made every post a winning one to claim the Irish Stallion Farms EBF Maiden (C & G).

Shane Foley kicked for home on the Mount Nelson colt as they turned into the straight and repelled the peristent Elleval by a short head.

The first division of the Crowne Plaza Hotel Race & Stay Handicap went to the Edward Lynam-trained Dimitar (9-2) under Wayne Lordan, while the second division went to 20-1 chance Curl Cat under Rory Cleary.

Pat Smullen got among the winners when driving home 9-2 chance Hes Our Music in the Crowne Plaza Leading Jockey And Trainer Championship Handicap.

Might Bite To Prove His Worth Next Season

There is not much attention given to national hunt racing in the summer months, by punters or by the media. It is, of course, understandable given that our attention is focused on the flat season: the action at Royal Ascot, the Classics and the rest of the elements that define the summer racing season. Some punters might have a dabble at an ante post bet for Cheltenham next year, but by and large we forget about it until the autumn.

THE IRISH TIMES