Navan Hopeful After Dry Day

Fri 23rd Nov 2012, 16:37

Action at Navan
©Healy Racing Photos
By Gary Carson
Racecourse manager Darren Lawlor is hopeful that Navan will get the go ahead on Sunday after the course enjoyed a dry day today.

The track is set for a 3pm inspection tomorrow ahead of Sunday's Troytown Chase card at the Meath venue.

The ground is currently heavy but raceable and a precautionary check was called for Saturday due to the forecast for heavy showers today.

“We've had no rain today - touch wood. We were forecast to have 5 or 6mm but haven't had any. It's been a beautiful cold winter day,” said Lawlor.

“They did say there was the possibility that it would skirt around us. So hopefully it misses us tomorrow as well.

“We're a lot happier than we would have been first thing this morning. You never like to be too optimistic as the weather has a habit of making an eejit of you!

“We'll still inspect tomorrow in case the rain comes later than forecast but we are raceable at the minute.

“The temperature is set to be quite cold tonight but that should be fine by the time of the inspection.

“It's a good card on Sunday and we're looking forward to it. Hopefully it gets the go ahead and we get a good crowd.”

Battaash v Lady Aurelia

Following his breath-taking four length victory in the 2017 running of the Prix de L’Abbaye, it is difficult to envisage that any horse can beat Battaash over 5 furlongs when in that sort of form. It was a stunning performance where he made Group 1 sprinters look ordinary. A field that included the Nunthorpe Stakes winner Marsha in behind. So can he confirm himself as the top sprinter around or will it be another Royal Ascot success for the American speedster Lady Aurelia when the pair clash next month? Here we look at each horses credentials heading in to one of the most anticipated clashes of the season. You can see the latest betting on Royal Ascot now in which Star Sports currently make Battaash 11/4 favourite ahead of 3/1 Lady Aurelia to win the King Stand Stakes on 19th June.

THE IRISH TIMES